Category Archives: books

In Which I List the Books I’ve Read in 2008, Update 3.

I’ve gotten into a few series lately, primarily the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva, which I’ve read completely out of order (he does a great job of explaining things without giving away what happened in earlier books). The main character is an Israeli spy/assassin whose cover is as one of the world’s leading art restorers.

Other series include the Camel Club series by David Baldacci (I read the first one last year; just finished the third one without realizing there was a second until I was halfway through, so that’s cued up and ready to go) and the Ender series by Orson Scott Card. Again, bold means I’m actually attempting the whole book-on-paper thing (see here for explanation).

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In Which I List the Books I’ve Read in 2008, Update 2

Started but not completed yet (bold means I’m actually attempting the whole book-on-paper thing):

  • Barack Obama, The Audacity of Hope
  • Anne Rice, Christ The Lord: Cana
  • Nick Hornby, Fever Pitch
  • Nick Hornby, How To Be Good
  • Jasper Fforde, First Among Sequels
  • Arthur C. Clarke & Gentry Lee, Rama Revealed
  • Donald Miller, Blue Like Jazz
  • CS Lewis, The Screwtape Letters (read by John Cleese — brilliant!)
  • Nathaniel Philbrick, Mayflower

Completed:

  • Arthur C. Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama
  • Arthur C. Clarke & Gentry Lee, Rama II
  • Arthur C. Clarke & Gentry Lee, The Garden of Rama
  • Daniel Silva, The Messenger
  • Daniel Silva, The Confessor
  • Richard Matheson, I Am Legend
  • Brad Meltzer, The Millionaires
  • Daniel Silva, A Death in Vienna
  • Daniel Silva, Prince of Fire
  • Christopher Moore, A Dirty Job
  • Neil Forsyth, Delete This At Your Own Peril
  • Stephen King, Duma Key

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In Which I List the Books I’ve “Read” in 2008. Part 1

My commute is roughly 25 miles each way, so I spend a lot of time in the car/on the train. I kill most of that time listening to audio books. I discovered audio books in college while driving back and forth from Seattle to Indiana, and though I’ve got a lot of music on my ipod, I would guess that 90% of the time it’s on, it’s playing an audio book.

I’m a very auditory person (I think part of it is the ADD) and I often get lost on the page when I’m reading a book, but I can usually follow audio books pretty closely. I also have two young boys so there’s not a whole lot of time to sit and relax with a good book.

I’ll come back to these later with reviews, but here’s a list of the books I’ve “read” since January 1 (Bold means I actually read the hard copy):

Started but not completed yet:

  • Barack Obama, The Audacity of Hope
  • Anne Rice, Christ The Lord: Cana
  • Nick Hornby, Fever Pitch
  • Nick Hornby, How To Be Good
  • Jasper Fforde, First Among Sequels
  • Arthur C. Clarke, Rendezvous with Rama

Completed:

  • Daniel Silva, The Messenger
  • Daniel Silva, The Confessor
  • Richard Matheson, I Am Legend
  • Brad Meltzer, The Millionaires
  • Daniel Silva, A Death in Vienna
  • Daniel Silva, Prince of Fire
  • Christopher Moore, A Dirty Job
  • Neil Forsyth, Delete This At Your Own Peril
  • Stephen King, Duma Key

That’s all for now.

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In Which I Post A Reading In Honor of Read Across America Day.

Read Across America Day was today, so in honor of the event (created to celebrate Dr. Seuss’ Birthday), I’m posting a reading I did for a class in college.

I was doing an internship for a small magazine and one of my jobs was to scour newsletters sent in by churches and other ministries for items to include in a news briefs section. I was reading The Autobiography of Malcolm X at the time, and at work I received a newsletter from an organization in Florida in which the author expounded for several single-spaced typewritten legal-size pages on the theme of “The Positive Value of Slavery to Black Americans.”

It was an interesting read, to say the least, and led me to wonder if the author had ever met a “Black American.” I had a project due for an Oral Interpretation class and started to wonder how I could juxtapose some of the juicier tidbits from the essay with some of the early passages of Malcom X. In a little.brain moment at the school library when I’m sure I was supposed to be working on 18 other things, I found myself in the childrens’ book section, and an idea was born.

I present here a reading on racism, featuring segments of The Sneetches by Dr. Seuss, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and “The Positive Value of Slavery to Black Americans.” After the jump:

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